40+ Different Types of Daisies (And What They Look Like) - PlantSnap

40+ Different Types of Daisies (And What They Look Like)

by | Nov 24, 2020

Perhaps you’ve been to the plant nursery recently and been intimidated by the huge amount of daisy-like flowers available in the seed section. There are so many different types of daisies!

 

Or maybe you’ve been walking around your neighborhood and discovering new flowering plants and are wondering what they are. Botany can be intimidating, but it is also fun to learn about new plants!

 

This article should help you navigate just a few of the thousands of species of daisy-like plants that are commonly grown in gardens!

 

 

What Is a Daisy?

 

As with any common names for botany issues, the term ‘daisy’ can be slightly confusing. Some florists use ‘daisy’ to refer to any plant within the Asteraceae family. This can be problematic since the Asteraceae family is the second-largest plant family in the world. This family contains over 20,000 individual species and over 1,500 genera. 

 

Botanists, on the contrary, sometimes refer to plants exclusively within the Erigeron genus as daisies. This is just one genus within the Asteraceae family.

 

Either way, daisies are definitely plants within the Asteraceae family. However you cut it, there are hundreds, if not thousands of types of daisies in the world. 

 

Plants in the Asteraceae family have ray flowers, which are like the yellow parts of a sunflower, and disc flowers, which are like the brown middle part of a sunflower. Most people think of the ray flowers as petals. The former name for this family was Compositae, because the flowers are actually a composite of hundreds of these tiny ray and disc flowers. 

 

This list begins with some commonly grown species in the Erigeron genus and then explores other genera within the Asteraceae family that resemble our mental image of a common daisy. 

 

Daisies can be either herbaceous or woody, annual or perennial. While there are some trees within the Asteraceae family, most people wouldn’t consider those daisies. 

 

Where Do Daisies Come From?

 

The daisy family is spread across the entire globe, from north of the Arctic Circle all the way down to the tropics and Australia. The beginnings of the Asteraceae family are poorly understood. The plants began to emerge at least 100 million years ago when the continents were much closer together than today. 

 

Asteraceae offered good pollen rewards and attractive flowers for the pollinators of 100 million years ago when wildflowers were less diverse and perhaps less nutritious. These enticing resources encouraged bees, hummingbirds, other pollinators, and herbivores to unknowingly spread the flowers around the world through pollination and seed dispersal. 

 

Today, the daisy family is most often associated with open meadows and grasslands. While they are typically most diverse in those habitats, I dare you to try and find a habitat without some representatives from the Asteraceae family! They are absolutely everywhere!

 

 

types of daisies

Erigeron flowers usually have purple to white ray flowers and yellow disc flowers.

 

 

True Daisies – Erigeron 

 

Common Fleabane – Erigeron philadelphicus

 

Color 

White flowers to purple ray flowers and yellow disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

Native to the lower 48 United States and Canada. Widespread across North America. Grows on roadsides, woodlands, and fields. 

 

Growth Pattern

Biennial herb that grows in tufts that reach 1 to 3 feet tall. Spreads by runners.

 

Care

Common fleabane prefers full sun and will tolerate partial shade. It grows best in moist, fertile loam, but can tolerate drier areas and some clay. This plant can spread readily if planted in the right environment, sometimes against a gardener’s wishes. 

 

Daisy Fleabane – Erigeron annuus

 

Color

This popular daisy has ray flowers that are usually white, sometimes pale lavender. Disc flowers yellow.

 

Nativity

This plant occurs naturally in every continental U.S. state except some of the Rocky Mountain states. It is a widespread U.S. native. This is a common wildflower and a classic daisy.

 

Growth Pattern

Daisy fleabane thrives in disturbed spots, such as roadsides, eroded areas, fields, and burned areas. It competes well against non-native weeds. It is usually an herbaceous annual but can grow as a perennial in some circumstances. 

 

Care

Plant daisy fleabane in moist soils. It will grow in a wide array of soil types. This plant doesn’t do well with drought stress. 

 

 

Mexican Daisy (Erigeron karvinskianus)

Mexican Daisy (Erigeron karvinskianus) drapes over a rock wall.

 

 

Mexican Daisy – Erigeron karvinskianus

 

Color

White to purple ray flowers with yellow disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This low-maintenance flower is native from Mexico down through Central America to Colombia. It has been introduced to the west coast of the U.S. and Hawaii, where it can be invasive in the right climates. 

 

Growth Pattern

Mexican Daisy (sometimes called Latin American daisy) is enjoyed by gardeners for its trailing tendency. It will gracefully grow over the sides of pots and walls.It will grow in a low mat-like formation, covering an area about five feet wide when mature. It spreads through woody rhizomes.

 

Care

This daisy does well when grown in mild, coastal climates. It can flower almost year-round in cool, moist, not-too-sunny climates. Mexican daisy doesn’t survive temperatures much below 15°F. When planted inland, it will stop producing flowers in the summer when it gets hot. 

 

Pink Santa Barbara Daisy – Erigeron x moerheimii

 

Color

Similar to Mexican daisy, which it is derived from, but with pink ray flowers instead of lavender. The flowers tend to be slightly larger than Mexican daisy flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is probably a hybrid of Mexican daisy and some other kind of daisy. It was created in Holland in the late 1800s. 

 

Growth Pattern

This plant isn’t as aggressive as the Mexican daisy. It grows in mats, but the mats tend to stay contained around three feet wide. Mexican daisies, in contrast, seem to grow outwards indefinitely. Pink Santa Barbara Daisy spreads through woody rhizomes and is a perennial. 

 

Care

Very similar care to Mexican daisy. Hardy to 10-15°F. This daisy does best when kept slightly moist throughout the summer. It will tolerate a wide array of soil types. 

 

 

Seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus)

A stellar example of Seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) in full bloom!

 

 

Seaside Daisy – Erigeron glaucus

 

Color

Short to long, pale to dark lavender ray flowers with large, yellow disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

Seaside daisy is native to the coast of Oregon and California. It grows on sand dunes, beaches, and coastal bluffs. 

 

Growth Pattern

Seaside daisy is a perennial herb that grows in lot mats and spreads through wood rhizomes, much like Mexican daisy. This daisy is a very attractive member of the west coast flora. 

 

Care

This daisy will grow quickly in the proper, coastal habitats. It needs little water once established. However, if growing inland it needs a little more supplemental water. Prefers clay soils on steep slopes and sandy soils on flat areas. Hardy to 15°F. 

 

Beach Aster – Erigeron glaucus x ‘Wayne Roderick’

 

Color

Pale to dark lavender ray flowers with yellow disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is a hybrid of erigeron glaucus and an unknown erigeron species. Since it is probably an entirely horticultural creation, it is probably best to refrain from giving it a nativity status. But if you needed to, I guess you could say California. 

 

Growth Pattern

Beach aster grows in low mats and spreads by woody rhizomes. As the horticultural version of seaside daisy, it has some preferable traits for the gardeners. First, with regular deadheading, this plant will flower virtually the entire year. It also tolerates colder temperatures than a seaside daisy. Some varieties also have much darker purple flowers than the seaside daisy. 

 

Care

The care for beach daisy is almost identical to seaside daisy (see above). Will do great in sandy soils!

 

Aspen Fleabane – Erigeron speciosus

 

Color

‘Speciosus’ in Latin means ‘pretty.’ These daisy flower heads are the lavender and yellow you would expect from an erigeron with long, dense ray flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the western U.S. and western Canada. 

 

Growth Pattern

Like other erigeron species mentioned, aspen fleabane spreads through underground, woody rhizomes. It is a perennial plant with herbaceous stalks. Much more cold tolerant than the seaside daisies, this plant will survive deep freezes down to -20°F. 

 

Care

As its name implies, this fleabane likes habitats that are similar to aspen groves. These groves are typically wet, high in organic matter, fertile, and partly sunny. Don’t let the soil of aspen fleabanes dry out in the summer! 

 

 

black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta)

A field of black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta)

 

 

Rudbeckia

 

Black-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia hirta

 

Color

Black-eyed Susans have dark brown disc flowers that resemble the ‘black eye.’ The long ray flowers of Rudbeckia hirta are yellow. 

 

Nativity

Black-eyed Susan is native to most of the lower 48 and Canada. Humans have introduced this plant to new locations all over the U.S., causing some ecologists to call it ‘naturalized’ in some areas. 

 

Growth Pattern

This plant grows as a short-lived perennial in the wild, but many gardeners use it as an annual. It can grow up to three feet tall and forms a contained clump of vegetation. 

 

Care

Rudbeckia hirta prefers clay soils and loams. It doesn’t tolerate sandy soils because it likes to have consistently wet roots. While this plant can survive without supplemental water in many areas, irrigation will increase bloom production and length. Grow black-eyed Susans in full sun to part shade. This plant will tolerate most cold areas of the U.S. It is hardy down to -30°F. 

 

Gloriosa Daisy – Rudbeckia hirta

 

Color

Gloriosa daisies are a group of horticultural forms of black-eyed Susans with more interesting colors. A common variety of gloriosa daisies has ray flowers that transition from red, dark centers in the middle to yellow on the outside. Other varieties include orange, pink, and bright red. Sometimes gloriosa daisies include many rows of ray flowers, making for a fuller flower than black-eyed Susans. 

 

Nativity

Gloriosa daisies are horticultural versions of black-eyed Susan’s, which are native throughout the U.S. 

 

Growth Pattern

Commonly grown as a perennial instead of an annual. Otherwise, the growth pattern of a gloriosa daisy is the same as the black-eyed Susan (see above).

 

Care

Gloriosa daisy will perform best in fertile, moist loams. They are hardy to -30°F. Be sure to deadhead frequently to force the plant to continue flowering from early spring to summer!

 

 

brown-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia triloba)

A small cluster of brown-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia triloba). Notice how the ray flowers are more compact than in black-eyed Susans.

 

 

Brown-eyed Susan – Rudbeckia triloba

 

Color

Stubby, yellow-ray flowers that surround a rounded group of brown disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the eastern U.S. It is introduced in eastern Canada and the western U.S. 

 

Growth Pattern

Brown-eyed Susans grow as a clump that reaches three feet tall, occasionally five feet tall. The plant branches frequently, creating a dense appearance. This plant is a biennial. In some cases, it can be weedy. 

 

Care

Brown-eyed Susan’s grow naturally in fertile areas near streams in open woods. They do best in full sun and will grow okay in part shade. These plants are hardy to -20°F. Rudbeckia triloba will live through minor drought conditions but isn’t exceptionally drought tolerant. 

 

Cutleaf Coneflower – Rudbeckia laciniata

 

Color

Yellow ray flowers and green foliage disc flowers. As the flower matures, the disc flowers expand into seeds and create a green ‘cone’ in the middle of the flower. 

 

Nativity

Cutleaf coneflower is native to all the lower 48 except Oregon, Nevada, and California. It is native to most Canadian provinces as well. 

 

Growth Pattern

In the wild, this plant can reach nine feet tall! In gardens, it rarely exceeds four feet. It can spread aggressively through underground woody rhizomes, which can be a problem in some gardens. Many gardeners use it as a border plant. The leaves of cutleaf coneflower are deeply lobed into three to five lobes.

 

Care

Cutleaf coneflower does best in part-sun to full sun. It will grow in most average soils, providing they don’t contain too much clay. This coneflower enjoys hot, humid areas. It is hardy to -40°F (fun fact: -40°F is also -40°C).

 

 

orange coneflower, type of daisy

The orange coneflower looks similar to the black-eyed Susan, just a little more golden-orange in color.

 

 

Orange Coneflower – Rudbeckia fulgida

 

Color

Contrary to its name, the ray flowers of this coneflower are more often a deep yellow rather than an all-out orange. Occasionally the ray flowers will be bright orange. The disc flowers are brown. 

 

Nativity

This coneflower is native to the eastern U.S. and introduced in eastern Canada. 

 

Growth Pattern

Orange coneflower will form dense colonies in the wild. These plants are clump-forming and grow up to three feet tall as stand-alone stalks.

 

Care

These coneflowers grow in moist soils that stay decently moist throughout the growing season. They need full sun and can survive drought once established. The plant is an herbaceous perennial that survives the winter through its woody, rhizomatous roots.

 

 

common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

A common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) grows in between bricks. Is there even any soil down there?

 

 

Taraxacum 

 

Common Dandelion – Taraxacum officinale

 

Color

Yellow ray flowers. No disc flowers.

 

Nativity

The common dandelion was probably native to Europe and Asia. This little flower has made its way to just about every corner of the globe and has naturalized to all climates, topographies, and soil types. 

 

Growth Pattern

Common dandelions grow from a basal rosette with a long taproot. They will take over whatever amount of space they can colonize. Sometimes they will grow as a single plant, other times they will entirely take over a disturbed area, such as the margins of a parking lot. 

 

Care

You don’t really need to care for common dandelions. They will grow absolutely anywhere whether you like it or not. 

 

Red-seeded Dandelion – Taraxacum erythrospermum

 

Color

Yellow ray flowers and no disc flowers.

 

Nativity

This plant is native to Europe and has successfully naturalized in all U.S. states and Canadian provinces. 

 

Growth Pattern

Red-seeded dandelion grows the same way as common dandelion. It forms a basal rosette of leaves with a taproot. The leaves of this dandelion are more deeply lobed than other dandelions. This plant is entirely edible!

 

Care

Again, this plant is more commonly a nuisance rather than a desired companion. It grows in disturbed areas, meadows, and just about any crack in the concrete that receives sunlight. 

 

Pink Dandelion – Taraxacum carneocoloratum

 

Color

The pink dandelion has pinkish ray flowers and no disc flowers. These dandelions are more full and attractive than the common dandelion. 

 

Nativity

Not all dandelions are non-native to the U.S.! The pink dandelion occurs in Alaska and the Yukon Territory of Canada. It is a potentially vulnerable species that grows in harsh, alpine environments. There are dozens of other native Taraxacum species throughout North America. It’s always exciting to differentiate between a non-native and native dandelion.

 

Growth Pattern

This plant has a basal rosette and a taproot. 

 

Care

This plant isn’t grown horticulturally. In general, it is difficult to raise alpine plants in home gardens. 

 

 

Gerbera daisy

Gerbera flowers displayed in a vase.

 

 

Gerbera

 

Hilton Daisy – Gerbera aurantiaca

 

Color

Usually bright red ray flowers with red to scarlet disc flowers. Some varieties have yellow, pink, or orange-ray flowers. These flowers are large and very attractive. 

 

Nativity

This plant is originally from the South African province of Kwa-Zulu Natal, where it is currently endangered. 

 

Growth Pattern

The leaves of this plant form an upright basal rosette. The flowers grow on 12-18 inch stalks that grow from the center of the basal rosette. In nature, this plant is a long-lived perennial. 

 

Care

Since this plant is endangered, you probably shouldn’t grow it. However, if you are ever lucky enough to witness it in the wild, know that they are special plants!

 

 

Transvaal daisy (Gerbera jamesonii)

The red Transvaal daisy (Gerbera jamesonii)

 

 

Transvaal Daisy – Gerbera jamesonii

 

Color

The ray flowers of the Transvaal daisy are most often red, but can also be orange, pink, and orange. Disc flowers are red to deep scarlet. 

 

Nativity

This daisy is native to South Africa. The South African province of Mpumulanga even has a depiction of this daisy on their flag! Mpumulanga is the sub-tropical province in South Africa. Therefore, this plant only grows best in the warmer climates of the U.S. 

 

Growth Pattern

The Transvaal daisy grows in low clumps. It sends up 12-18 long stalks that bear a single flower. The plant is a delicate perennial. 

 

Care

In Florida and perhaps more mild climates of California, this plant can be grown as a perennial. Elsewhere, however, it is best grown as an annual planted in full sun in well-draining soil. 

 

 

Gerbera daisy

A variety of a Gerbera daisy.

 

 

Gerbera Daisy – Gerbera hybrida

 

Color

Gerbera daisies come in just about every possible flower color. They are one of the most common cut flowers in the world. 

 

Nativity

Gerbera daisy is a cross between Gerbera jamesonii and another South African plant, Gerbera viridifolia. I guess that would make it native to South Africa, even though it is mostly a human creation. 

 

Growth Pattern

Gerbera daisies grow as low, full plants that bear plenty of flowers. An individual plant fills up about one square foot and reaches 18 inches high. The flowers are 3-4 inches across. 

 

Care

Gerbera daisies, as with nearly all cut flowers, bloom and grow best in the most sun possible. They like slightly sandy soils with a decent amount of compost or nutrients. Fun fact: Gerbera daisies can be grown indoors, where they produce more oxygen than most houseplants!

 

 

oxeye daisy

A dense stand of oxeye daisy. Sometimes this plant can cover acres this densely with flowers, causing a nuisance for land managers.

 

 

Leucanthemum/ Chrysanthemum

 

Oxeye Daisy – Leucanthemum vulgare

 

Color

White petals with a yellow center. 

 

Nativity

This plant is an aggressive non-native plant from temperate Europe and Asia. In some states, it is prohibited to grow, sell, or distribute ox-eye daisy plants or seeds. It can create incredibly dense stands that prohibit any other plants from growing. There are better plants to plant than oxeye daisy! Whenever you see ‘vulgare’ in a species name, beware. 

 

Growth Pattern

Oxeye daisy grows up to three feet tall and spreads through rhizomes underground. It is a herbaceous perennial. When not controlled, it can create monolithic stands in a matter of years. 

 

Care

This pushy plant will crowd out many of your more cherished garden specimens. As with other noxious weeds, this plant doesn’t need care to thrive. 

 

 

Shasta daisies

Very similar in appearance to the oxeye daisy, Shasta daisies aren’t as invasive.

 

 

Shasta Daisy – Leucanthemum x superbum

 

Color

White daisy ray flowers with yellow disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is another hybrid, this time from a Leucanthemum native to Mt. Shasta in California and the oxeye daisy. Horticulturist legend, Luther Burbank, bred this plant. It isn’t as invasive as oxeye daisy and is a much beloved garden flower. 

 

Growth Pattern

This daisy is a rhizomatous, perennial herb, sometimes grown as an annual. It grows one to four feet tall depending on the situation. 

 

Care 

These plants need full sun and proper drainage to bloom profusely. Adding compost to your soil will increase drainage over time. Fertilize these flowers for extra blooms. 

 

Chrysanthemum – Chrysanthemum morifolium

 

Color

There are hundreds of known varieties of Chrysanthemum morifolium. The flowers come in all sorts of shapes, colors, and sizes. Some varieties are the kind of herbal chrysanthemum that you drink in tea!

 

Nativity

This plant is native to China, where it has been used for hundreds of years in medicine. 

 

Growth Pattern

Grows two to three feet wide and about one to two feet tall. It is a perennial commonly grown as an annual in colder climates. 

 

Care

Give chrysanthemums full sun and well draining soils. This plant can be a heavy feeder if given fertilizer. Deadhead frequently for the longest bloom period. 

 

 

daisy variety, Arctotis stoechadifolia

Arctotis varieties have many hybrids and colors, making classification difficult. This is probably a horticultural variety of Arctotis stoechadifolia, even though it obviously isn’t white!

 

 

Arctotis

 

White Arctotis – Arctotis stoechadifolia

 

Color

White ray flowers that turn yellow near the disc flowers. Brown disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This is a rare plant native to sand dunes in the Cape Floristic Province of South Africa. Some botanists think it is the same species as the widely adopted horticultural flower, Arctotis venusta. The jury is still out on that one. 

 

Growth Pattern

Grows as a low creeping mat. This is a perennial plant.

 

Care

Full sun and drought tolerant once established. Doesn’t tolerate hard frosts. 

 

 

silver arctotis (Arctotis venusta)

A silver arctotis (Arctotis venusta) in bloom.

 

 

Silver Arctotis – Arctotis venusta

 

Color

Silver ray flowers with yellow to blue disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

Silver Arctotis is native to the Cape Province of South Africa. 

 

Growth Pattern

Arctotis venusta grows as a low, wooly mat-forming ground cover. For such small leaves, this plant produces nice, showy blooms. It is a perennial plant. 

 

Care

This plant grows in a wide variety of climates. It does best in slightly acidic, well-drained soils in full sun. It likes to be kept consistently moist, but it will tolerate drought once it has established. 

 

 

daisy type, Monarch-of-the-veld

What a cool flower! Monarch-of-the-veld is a showstopper for gardens.

 

 

Monarch-of-the-Veld – Arctotis fastuosa

 

Color

This flower is amazing! It’s ray petals transition from white to black to red. The disc flowers are black and white. Other varieties are orange and scarlet. 

 

Nativity

This Arctotis is also native to South Africa. It has naturalized in some areas of southern California. 

 

Growth Pattern

This annual plant seems to grow as tall as the amount of water it receives. Sometimes it can reach six feet in height. More often it is one to two feet tall. The flowers are borne on solitary stalks. 

 

Care

These daisies do best with full sun, frequent watering, nutrient-rich, well-drained soils. 

 

 

osteospermum daisy

A bright purple variety of osteospermum

 

 

Osteospermum

 

African Daisy – Osteospermum ecklonis

 

Color

African daisies come in most colors, including bright purple, pink, orange, white, and yellow. 

 

Nativity

This type of daisy is native to southern parts of the African continent. Most commercially available ‘African daisies’ are hybrids of Osteospermum ecklonis and Osteospermum jucundum

 

Growth Pattern

These herbaceous perennials grow one to two feet wide and up to three feet tall. They form clumps that look like low bushes. 

 

Care

These plants are only winter hardy to USDA zone 10, causing most American growers to plant them as annuals. With plenty of sun, a moderate amount of water, and occasional fertilization, your African daisies should bloom throughout the entire summer. 

 

Trailing African Daisy – Osteospermum fruticosum

 

Color

The purple-to-white petals on this plant contrast nicely with its dark disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to South Africa. 

 

Growth Pattern

Unlike most African Daisies, this kind trails and forms mats up to six feet wide. The plant usually keeps low.

 

Care

This plant can only survive winters in mild climates. If you don’t have a mild climate, consider planting regular African daisies as an annual instead, since the trailing tendency of this plant is best appreciated after multiple years of growth. Prefers full sun, moderate water, and some fertilizer.

 

 

Echinacea purple coneflower

A nice stand of purple coneflower.

 

 

Echinacea

 

Purple Coneflower – Echinacea purpurea

 

Color

The ray flowers of Echinacea purpurea are a deep pink/purple. The disc flowers make a cone-like shape and are brown with orange tips. They kind of resemble a sea urchin, which is where the name Echinacea comes from. 

 

Nativity

Purple coneflower is native to the prairies of North America. It is one of the most widely used plants in herbal medicine. 

 

Growth Pattern

Purple coneflower is a perennial plant that grows a robust root system. The plants can get up to six feet tall in wet conditions. They bear single flowers on the end of long stalks. 

 

Care

In the wild, Echinacea enjoy sunny meadows. Once they establish they don’t need too much additional water or nutrients. Plant them in full sun for the best blooms!

 

Narrow-leaved Purple Coneflower – Echinacea angustifolia

 

Color

This coneflower looks almost identical to the purple coneflower, with purple/pink petals and a spiky, cone-shaped arrangement of disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

Echinacea angustifolia is native to the prairies of interior North America.

 

Growth Pattern

Narrow-leaved purple coneflower is a smaller, less full plant than the purple coneflower. It produces a deep web of roots like many grassland plants. 

 

Care

Drought tolerant once established, but will produce more blooms with more water. Doesn’t need much fertilizer. Requires full sun.

 

 

Pale purple coneflowers (Echinacea pallida)

Pale purple coneflowers (Echinacea pallida) have less robust blooms and are paler in color than Echinacea purpurea.

 

 

Pale Purple Coneflower – Echinacea pallida

 

Color

Looks similar to the purple coneflower but with more pale ray flowers. They are usually a light pinkish color. The disc flowers are brown in the middle and orange at the tips. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the eastern United States. 

 

Growth Pattern

Like the other Echinacea species, this plant is a perennial that grows in tight clumps. 

 

Care

Pale purple coneflower will grow in almost any soil as long as it doesn’t remain waterlogged for long periods of time. Plant in full sun. 

 

 

English daisies

The hundreds of compact ray flowers give English daisies their unique charm.

 

 

Bellis

 

English Daisy ‘Bellissima’ – Bellis perennis

 

Color

The ray flowers are typically white to pink to red. The disc flowers are yellow. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the Mediterranean and parts of Asia. 

 

Growth Pattern

This herbaceous perennial that spreads in a mat-like way. It remains a low plant. 

 

Care

English daisies do not tolerate drought, but will tolerate some shade. They prefer well-drained soils with plenty of fertilizer. Most people grow them as annuals rather than perennials. 

 

English Daisy ‘Pomponette’ – Bellis perennis

 

Color

Same variety as the regular english daisy. This variety has tons of ray flowers, causing the flowers to appear as tiny pom poms. 

 

Nativity

This horticultural plant has been bred from Bellis perennis, which is native to the Mediterranean and Asia. 

 

Growth Pattern

A low growing herbaceous perennial. 

 

Care

English daisies do not tolerate drought, but will tolerate some shade. They prefer well-drained soils with plenty of fertilizer. 

 

 

variety of zinnia

A variety of zinnia. Notice the intriguing disc flowers, which are unlike that of most daisies.

 

 

Zinnia

 

Tall Zinnia –  Zinnia elegans

 

Color

Zinnias come in every shade of yellow, pink, orange, red, purple, and white. The disc flowers can vary in color, but usually have characteristic yellow stars at the top.

 

Nativity

Zinnias are native from the Southwestern U.S. down to South America, with the center of their diversity in Mexico. 

 

Growth Pattern

Tall zinnias grow, as you would expect, much taller than other types of zinnias. They can reach six feet tall, branching lightly with one flower at the end of each stalk.

 

Care

Zinnias grow strongest in full sun. They don’t tolerate drought very well and will feed heavily if given fertilizer. They prefer well-drained soils. 

 

Dwarf Zinnia – Zinnia elegans

 

Color

Like the tall zinnia, these plants have petals that come in many colors. 

 

Nativity

The southwestern U.S. to South America.

 

Growth Pattern

Dwarf zinnias grow as a low, mounded bush. They can be about 18 inches wide and tall when mature. 

 

Care

These herbaceous annuals grow best in fertile soil, full sun, and with ample water. 

 

Cactus Zinnia – Zinnia haageana

 

Color

The petals of cactus zinnia are usually a mix of yellows and reds, often with a deep scarlet color. 

 

Nativity

Mexico

 

Growth Pattern

Low, mound-forming herbaceous perennials. 

 

Care

Full sun, well-drained, fertile soil, and consistently moist soil.

 

 

type of daisy, bachelor’s buttons

An attractive display of bachelor’s buttons.

 

 

Bachelor’s Buttons

 

Bachelor’s Buttons (Cornflower) – Centaurea cyanus

 

Color

Bachelor’s buttons’ petals are usually pastel pinks, blues, and whites. They don’t have disc flowers. 

 

Nativity

Europe and the British Islands.

 

Growth Pattern

Bachelor’s buttons grow as delicate, herbaceous annuals. 

 

Care

Bachelor’s buttons will easily break and die as they establish since they are so delicate. Be careful when handling these plants. They thrive in moist, well-drained, fertile soil with full sun. Frequent dead-heading of these plants ensures a long bloom period. 

 

Bachelor’s Buttons ‘Black Ball’ – Centaurea cyanus

 

Color

Dark purple petals, appearing almost black. 

 

Nativity

A horticultural variety derived from a plant native to Europe. 

 

Growth Pattern

Same as bachelor’s buttons.

 

Care

Full sun, well-drained soil, ample fertilizer, and plenty of water. 

 

Other Kinds of Daisies 

 

Marguerite Daisy – Argyranthemum frutescens

 

Color

Pink, yellow, or white petals with a yellow center. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain. 

 

Growth Pattern

Grows as a tender perennial or, more commonly, as an annual by gardeners. 

 

Care

When given full sun, moderate water, and some fertilizer, this plant should produce lovely blooms throughout the summer! However, it might abort flowers in strong summer heatwaves. 

 

 

Blanketflower

Blanketflower is one of our most delightful natives!

 

 

Indian Blanketflower – Gaillardia pulchella

 

Color

Petals that transition from yellow to deep scarlet towards the center. The disc flowers are red. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to most of the U.S. minus the northwestern quarter of the country. 

 

Growth Pattern

Blanketflower grows as a low shrubby mount. The flowers sometimes seem disproportionately large compared to the relatively compact plant. 

 

Care

This plant does best in well-drained soils with full sun. It can tolerate some drought and less fertile soils. 

 

 

mexican marigold

A small Mexican marigold shrub. If you ever see this plant be sure to smell it!

 

 

Mexican Marigold – Tagetes lemmonii

 

Color

The flowers have matching bright yellow ray and disc flowers. The smell of this plant is to die for!

 

Nativity

Mexico and southern Arizona

 

Growth Pattern

Mexican marigold grows as a woody shrub with delicate, pinnatifid leaves. It reaches four to six feet in height when mature and can make a fine hedge. 

 

Care

Mexican marigold won’t survive in areas that get below 10°F in the winter. These plants are extremely drought tolerant and can thrive in poor soils. They need full sun. 

 

Painted Daisy – Tanacetum coccinium

 

Color 

Painted daisies ray flowers come in all the yellows, pinks, reds, and oranges you could ever ask for. They have yellow disc flowers. The flowers are large, typically three inches wide. 

 

Nativity

This plant is native to the Caucus mountains and surrounding areas of central Asia. They have gone through the whole gambit of horticultural treatments to make all the exceptional varieties available today. 

 

Growth Pattern

These flowers are great for cut flower bouquets. They have interesting leaves and very showy, large flowers that hold up well days after cutting. This species isn’t considered invasive, unlike its cousin Tanacetum vulgare. It grows as a full, bushy perennial. 

 

Care

Growers don’t recommend planting these daisies south of USDA zone 7, which precludes the entire southern U.S. from growing painted daisies. In hotter areas of its potential range, this plant prefers shade. In the colder areas, it grows best in full sun. This plant will do best in average fertility, well-drained, somewhat moist soils. 

 

Daisies, among other types of flowers, are fascinating and full of variety. Hopefully, you’ve learned more about this low-maintenance plant that grows from early summer to late summer, and beyond, depending on the mulch, care, and florist in charge!

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.